Seminar Colour Guide:              
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 21 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarUnfolding genetic networks and complex phenotypes using baker s yeastChristina Roberts, Victoria University of Wellington; Volpara Solutions Ltd, New ZealandHost: Nassos Typas/Bede BusbySmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: The majority of phenotypes are complex, meaning they are controlled by multiple genes, many of them unknown. It follows that genetic contributions to phenotypes need to be assessed in an unbiased manner considering the genome as a whole. Simple eukaryote model organisms, such as the baker s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are powerful tools for understanding genetic complexity owing to their genetic tractability and the availability of molecular genetics tools.

The yeast field has established S. cerevisiae with genome-wide gene deletion sets allowing interrogation of genetic interaction networks of genes by a process known as synthetic genetic array (SGA). SGA allows functionality to be inferred from pairs of gene mutations that have epistatic effects interacting in cellular processes For example, individual disruption of the genes IRE1 and HAC1 (responsible for the initiation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) revealed overlapping networks of genes that become essential in ER stress when the UPR is abrogated. More generally gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that these networks are enriched for terms related to protein folding, such as glycosylation, protein localisation to the ER, ubiquitination. Furthermore, induction of ER stress by treatment with dithiothreitol and tunicamycin revealed additional processes that become essential in the absence of the UPR, such as retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport.

The genetic architecture of a complex phenotypes such as individual strain drug response can also be elucidated by quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. We used advanced intercross lines (AIL) and next generation sequencing-bulk segregant analysis (NGS-BSA) to characterise the QTL underpinning response to the antifungals benomyl and ketoconazole. We found that drug response was controlled by multiple QTL, a number of which are strain-specific and most of which were not the known targets of the drugs. Furthermore, even when QTL were shared between strains, they often exhibited variable genetic effect on the response phenotype. Such studies build the foundation for understanding drug response in individuals and side effects
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 2 October 2017, 10:30Add to calendarTo be announcedMeghan Driscoll, UT Southwestern Medical Center, USAHost: Jan EllenbergSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 4 October 2017, 15:00Add to calendarOpen Talk: Research Ethics and Publishing Bernd Pulverer, EMBO, GermanyHost: Toby GibsonSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Developmental Biology and Differentiation, Cell Regulation and Signaling, Cell Biology, Biological Networks, Gene Regulation, Imaging and Image Analysis, Neurobiology, Biocomputing, Structural Biology, Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Systems Biology, Molecular Medicine, Evolution, Biophysics, Plant Biology, Proteomics, RNA, Engineering
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 9 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarAutoimmune priming, tissue attack and chronic inflammation the three stages of an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritisRikard Holmdahl, Karolinska Institute, SwedenHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Extensive genome wide association studies have recently shed some light on the causes of chronic autoimmune diseases and have confirmed a central role of the adaptive immune system. Moreover, better diagnostics using disease-associated autoantibodies have been developed, and treatment has improved through the development of biologicals with precise molecular targets.
Here, I will discuss rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease to propose that the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases could be divided into three discrete stages. First, yet unknown environmental challenges seem to activate innate immunity thereby providing an adjuvant signal for the induction of adaptive immune responses that lead to the production of autoantibodies and determine the subsequent disease development. Second, a joint-specific inflammatory reaction occurs. This inflammatory reaction might be clinically diagnosed as the earliest signs of the disease. Third, inflammation is converted to a chronic process leading to tissue destruction and remodeling. I will discuss the stages involved in RA pathogenesis and the experimental approaches, mainly involving animal models that can be used to investigate each disease stage. In particular I will focus on the tissue attack and how this could be prevented. Although the focus is on RA, it is likely that a similar stepwise development of disease also occurs in other chronic autoimmune settings such as multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 9 October 2017, 14:00Add to calendartbdThomas Dobner, HPI HAMBURG, GermanyHost: Kiran PatilSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology, Gene Regulation, RNA, Systems Biology
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Wednesday, 11 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAvinash Patel, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, GermanyHost: Theodore AlexandrovSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 11 October 2017, 15:00Add to calendarRecruitment dynamics of ESCRT-III and Vps4 to endosomes and implications for reverse membrane buddingDavid Teis, Biocenter, Division Cell Biology, Innsbruck Medical University, , AustriaHost: Bernhard Hampoelz and Martin BeckSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing, Structural Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 19 October 2017, 14:00Add to calendarMolecular genetics of severe cardiomyopathiesHendrik Milting, Universitätsklinikum der Ruhr-Universität Bochum, GermanyHost: Lars SteinmetzRoom 13-518 a + b, EMBL Heidelberg
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Friday, 20 October 2017, 10:00Add to calendarAdhesive fimbriae of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria: mechanisms of assembly and receptor recognitionNatalia Pakharukova, University of Turku, FinlandHost: Martin BeckRoom 202, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Structural Biology
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Thursday, 26 October 2017, 15:00Add to calendarRNA polymerase and the ribosome: A snapshot of the central dogma of molecular biologyRebecca Kohler, Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Muenchen, GermanyHost: Martin BeckSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Gene Regulation, Structural Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 9 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBing Ren, University of California, USAHost: Jan KorbelThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Baker, University of Washington, USAHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarMolecular gastronomy: questions of scientific strategy and applicationsHervé This, International Centre for Molecular Gastronomy AgroParisTech-INRA, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Molecular gastronomy is the scientific discipline that looks for the mechanisms of phenomena occurring during food preparation. It was created (formally in 1988) because it was realized that a wealth of original phenomena were neglected by physical chemistry, so that possibilities of discoveries were many. It develops in many countries of the world (and should not be confused with cooking, and in particular with "molecular cooking" or "molecular cuisine", which are applications).
How to make discoveries? This question is of course not restricted to molecular gastronomy, but some examples of results can show various ways of getting scientific results, the most important being probably the set up of new observation tools, or the idea that "Any result should be considered as a "projection" of general cases that we have to invent".
Concerning applications, the latest is called "note by note cooking", and it is the exact equivalent of synthetic music, a reason why it could also be called synthetic cooking. The definition is simply: make food from pure compounds, instead of tradition food ingredients (vegetables, meats, fruits, fishs, eggs...). This culinary trend is spreading today.
Science and Society
Monday, 4 December 2017, 15:00Add to calendarImprobable Research and the Ig Nobel PrizesMarc Abrahams, Ig Nobel Prize, USAHost: Halldór StefánssonThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 13 December 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedFrancois Schweisguth, Institut Pasteur, FranceHost: Stefano De RenzisSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg