Seminar Colour Guide:              
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 20 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarBioelectricity in regeneration and body patterning of planariaJohanna Bischof, Tufts University, Department of Biology, USAHost: Peter LenartRoom 13-518 a + b, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarMolecular gastronomy: questions of scientific strategy and applicationsHervé This, International Centre for Molecular Gastronomy AgroParisTech-INRA, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Molecular gastronomy is the scientific discipline that looks for the mechanisms of phenomena occurring during food preparation. It was created (formally in 1988) because it was realized that a wealth of original phenomena were neglected by physical chemistry, so that possibilities of discoveries were many. It develops in many countries of the world (and should not be confused with cooking, and in particular with "molecular cooking" or "molecular cuisine", which are applications).
How to make discoveries? This question is of course not restricted to molecular gastronomy, but some examples of results can show various ways of getting scientific results, the most important being probably the set up of new observation tools, or the idea that "Any result should be considered as a "projection" of general cases that we have to invent".
Concerning applications, the latest is called "note by note cooking", and it is the exact equivalent of synthetic music, a reason why it could also be called synthetic cooking. The definition is simply: make food from pure compounds, instead of tradition food ingredients (vegetables, meats, fruits, fishs, eggs...). This culinary trend is spreading today.
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 27 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarFunctional reorganization of yeast genome during the cell cycleLuciana Lazar-Stefanita, Institut Pasteur, Paris, FranceHost: Christian HaeringRoom 13-518 a + b, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 30 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarPractical computational reproducibility in the life sciencesBjörn Grüning, Head of the Freiburg Galaxy Team, Bioinformatics Group, Universität Freiburg, GermanyHost: Charles GirardotSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing
Science and Society
Monday, 4 December 2017, 15:00Add to calendarImprobable Research and the Ig Nobel PrizesMarc Abrahams, Ig Nobel Prize, USAHost: Halldór StefánssonThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Why coffee cups spill, why woodpeckers don't get headaches, the bacteriological hazard of bearded men, an analysis of the forces required to drag sheep across various surfaces these are among the 270 things that have won Ig Nobel Prizes. The prizes honor research that makes people laugh, then think. Marc Abrahams, founder of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony at Harvard University, will discuss the wonder of the Ig Nobel Prizes, and of research that ventures outside the bounds of what people expect.
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 11:00Add to calendarComputational metagenomics for large-scale strain-resolved microbiome profilingNicola Segata, University of Trento, ItalyHost: Peer BorkSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 11:30Add to calendarRepresenting ultra-high resolution microbiomics using trees
Henrik Bjørn Nielsen, Clinical Microbiomics A/S, DenmarkHost: Peer BorkSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 13 December 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedFrancois Schweisguth, Institut Pasteur, FranceHost: Stefano De RenzisSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Monday, 18 December 2017, 18:00Add to calendarDynamic Genome and Epigenomes: How mosaic are we?Edith Heard, Institut Curie, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 16 February 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedStephan Preibisch, Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), GermanyHost: Yannick SchwabSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Monday, 7 May 2018, 18:00Add to calendarThe Human Genome; a promise or a constraint for the future?Denis Duboule, Federal Institute of Technology, SwitzerlandHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
Abstract: Ever since the first release of the human genome sequence in 2001, our knowledge of both the structure and function of our chromosomes has increased exponentially. Today, we are close to being in a position to use this knowledge and the accompanying technology to modify our own genetic material, these ...good old chromosomes, which haven t changed much since Cro-magnon , as stated by Jean Rostand in the late 1950 s. There are two distinct, though somewhat related frameworks where such potential modifications are currently being discussed and where various justifications are being formalized and put forward into the public domain. The first has to do with precision medicine , i.e. the possibility to use our genetic material as one of the major parameters, either to cure or to predict diseases. The second and perhaps more controversial context is that of trans-humanism, i.e. to try to move towards a novel human being (homo novus), as a result of genetic modifications along with technological assistance. In both cases, these future developments raise important questions and understandable concerns within our society, in particular regarding ethical and legal issues. In the meantime, and partly as a consequence of these valid societal questions, the critical scientific items underlying these potential advances are difficult to address in a rational context. Yet the discussions as to whether such future developments are consistent with our values, whether they are desirable or even necessary would likely be enriched by asking in parallel the questions related to the actual possibilities and feasibility of such approaches, i.e. to what extent our genome can either be interrogated to anticipate pathological states, or be modified to potentially improve human performances. From this utilitarian viewpoint, an important question is whether the increasing knowledge of our genetic material, its origin and its functioning make these new steps more or less likely to occur in a foreseeable future.
Science and Society
Thursday, 12 July 2018, 18:00Add to calendarWie Gliazellen zu Nervenzellen werden: neue Ansätze zur Therapie nach GehirnverletzungenMagdalena Götz, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
Abstract: Das menschliche Gehirn kann abgestorbene Nervenzellen größtenteils nicht mehr ersetzen. Um dies zu ändern, untersuchen wir die Mechanismen, wie Nervenzellen während der Entwicklung gebildet werden, um dies dann auch im erwachsenen Gehirn nach Verletzung auslösen zu können. Tatsächlich werden Nervenzellen während der Entwicklung von radialen Gliazellen gebildet, einem Zelltyp der bislang nur als Stützzelle angesehen wurde. Diese Gliazellen gehen bei der Reifung des Säugergehirns verloren und differenzieren in andere Gliazellen aus. Dementsprechend geht auch die Fähigkeit zur Bildung neuer Nervenzellen in den meisten Gehirnregionen verloren, mit Ausnahme weniger Regionen, in welchen radiale Gliazellen erhalten bleiben, und tatsächlich zeitlebens noch neue Nervenzellen gebildet werden. In vielen anderen Wirbeltieren bleiben diese Gliazellen weitverbreitet erhalten (Barbosa et al., Science 2015), und Gehirnverletzungen können ohne Narbenbildung völlig geheilt werden (Baumgart et al., Glia 2010). Wir arbeiten daran zu verstehen, wie diese radialen Gliazellen Nervenzellen bilden, und wie wir die Bildung von Nervenzellen auch in den differenzierten Gliazellen des Säugergehirns wieder auslösen können (als Übersichtsartikel: Masserdotti et al., Development 2016). Diesbezüglich haben wir gerade in den letzten Jahren große Fortschritte gemacht und es gelingt uns nun, viele narbenbildende Gliazellen in reife Nervenzellen nach Gehirnverletzung im Mausmodell umzuwandeln (Gascon et al., Cell Stem Cell 2016). Zudem konnten wir zeigen, dass auch Gehirnregionen, in denen normalerweise keine neue Nervenzellen im Erwachsenenstadium gebildet werden, die Fähigkeit besitzen, neue Nervenzellen wieder passend in das Nervenzellnetzwerk zu integrieren und die Funktion der abgestorbenen Nervenzellen wieder zu ersetzen. Die große Frage ist nun, ob dies auch für lokal aus Gliazellen umgewandelte Nervenzellen möglich ist.